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Whether I’m returning home at the end of the work day or a trip abroad, I love to be welcomed back by the scent of fallen leaves in Autumn.  There is a distinct sweet mustiness that wafts up from the copper colored beech tree leaves in my driveway.   Fallen pecan leaves smell more acrid, and oak leaves mixed with acorns have a scent that can only be described as oakiness.   And honey is the scent of Tulip Poplar leaves on the ground. It seems as if new developments in Atlanta are shunning trees with leaves in favor of evergreens such as cypress and arborvitae.  While these imported species may have value, they will never welcome the residents home to the sweet scent of fall leaves. I’d love to hear how you describe the scent of your trees.  Drop me a note and let’s savor the scent of...

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Someone came in the night and rummaged my car for valuables.  Left behind in the items on the floor were work gloves, a measuring tape, and hand pruners.  Obviously, the robber was not a pruning man. Here, at Gardens to Love, June is the month for detail pruning.  The shearing was finished last month and now it’s time for the details.  The little things like dead heading roses, cutting back spring flowering perennials, and shaping shrubbery with individual cuts, removing heavy lower limbs on ornamental trees is what we do for the June Prune. Our field manager, Marc Creamer, is a proud pro at pruning.  He can take a hopeless blob of a plant and prune it into a sculpted delight.  Give us a call and ask for Marc’s talent if you’ve got pruning to be...

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A Note From Marcia

A note from Marcia: I love having some of the outdoors indoors, and having a fistful of flowers or a branch or two in a vase is a great way to bring the garden inside in a small and delightful way. The flowers can be what  some might consider ordinary, such as pansies in winter, hellebores in early spring, or ubiquitous hydrangeas in summer and fall.  When I look out my window, I see so many possibilities for cutting. I like to cut something different and unusual from my garden.  When the sweetly scented native azaleas are blooming, I cut a big branch or a fistful of flowers for a small vase.  All it takes is a branch or two in a tall clear vase to make a statement and to fill the room with a delightful scent. India Hicks, the style maven who recently spoke at SCAD and showed pictures of her Harbor Island house, likes to use a single tropical leaf in a vase.  Here in urban Atlanta, a Kousa Dogwood branch in spring or a colorful coleus would look very smart. Tips to keep your flowers fresh: Use a floral preservative such as those the florist uses.  Grocery stores sell it in the flower section of the store. Keep daffodils in a separate vase.  The sap will wilt other flowers. Cut your flowers in the morning before the sun warms the day. In the house, place the vase out of direct sunlight. Always use sparkling clean containers....

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