facebook linkedin HouzzPinterest
[email protected] | 404-603-9705

Whether I’m returning home at the end of the work day or a trip abroad, I love to be welcomed back by the scent of fallen leaves in Autumn.  There is a distinct sweet mustiness that wafts up from the copper colored beech tree leaves in my driveway.   Fallen pecan leaves smell more acrid, and oak leaves mixed with acorns have a scent that can only be described as oakiness.   And honey is the scent of Tulip Poplar leaves on the ground. It seems as if new developments in Atlanta are shunning trees with leaves in favor of evergreens such as cypress and arborvitae.  While these imported species may have value, they will never welcome the residents home to the sweet scent of fall leaves. I’d love to hear how you describe the scent of your trees.  Drop me a note and let’s savor the scent of...

Read More
A Note From Marcia

A note from Marcia: I love having some of the outdoors indoors, and having a fistful of flowers or a branch or two in a vase is a great way to bring the garden inside in a small and delightful way. The flowers can be what  some might consider ordinary, such as pansies in winter, hellebores in early spring, or ubiquitous hydrangeas in summer and fall.  When I look out my window, I see so many possibilities for cutting. I like to cut something different and unusual from my garden.  When the sweetly scented native azaleas are blooming, I cut a big branch or a fistful of flowers for a small vase.  All it takes is a branch or two in a tall clear vase to make a statement and to fill the room with a delightful scent. India Hicks, the style maven who recently spoke at SCAD and showed pictures of her Harbor Island house, likes to use a single tropical leaf in a vase.  Here in urban Atlanta, a Kousa Dogwood branch in spring or a colorful coleus would look very smart. Tips to keep your flowers fresh: Use a floral preservative such as those the florist uses.  Grocery stores sell it in the flower section of the store. Keep daffodils in a separate vase.  The sap will wilt other flowers. Cut your flowers in the morning before the sun warms the day. In the house, place the vase out of direct sunlight. Always use sparkling clean containers....

Read More

January is the perfect time for fresh garden ideas to plan the next phase of your landscape. Take a peek at Pinterest and get inspired by creative concepts, or let your fingers stroll to Instagram and view the tapestry of gardens and landscapes featured there. Whatever you can imagine, we at Marcia Weber Gardens to Love, can design, install and maintain for you. Whether you want to add to the landscape you love, make elegant changes in the garden you have, or you are starting from scratch, we’ve got you covered. In fact, here are 10 of our favorite fresh garden ideas to keep your landscape looking good… #1 Reflect your landscape with a water feature. You can go big with a full waterfall over rocks, a pond or even a creek, or small with a subtle recirculator of water through a quiet sculpture. #2 Complement your garden with stone or ceramic vessels accenting nooks and corners. Containers come in all shapes, sizes, and finishes and are a wonderful portable element that is easy to change seasonally and move about your landscape as your mood strikes. #3 Enjoy your landscape with a place to sit and experience the fresh garden ideas surrounding you. Just creating places to pause in the garden and take in the beauty and wonder of your garden can be truly priceless. Whether it’s a bench just for two tucked beneath a shade tree or two stone seats hiding behind a mass of hydrangeas just out of sight, secret places in your garden are ideal for a cozy conversation. #4 Include classic architectural fragments or features as outdoor sculpture and focal points. While nature offers her own architecture, it can add an extra touch of elegance and personality to include elements like an antique sundial, estate statuary salvaged from the wrecking ball, and column fragments to define your landscape. #5 Improve your landscape with a pathway to guide and direct a garden stroll. Whether your style is straight and geometric or curved and creative, pathways deliver flow and purpose to a landscape. They can protect the lawn from being trampled, or be a meandering moment of meditation. #6 Expand your garden with additional trees, shrubs, and flowers. Having a master plan for your garden that you implement over time will give you something new to look forward to each year with fresh garden ideas. #7 Add an outdoor entertaining area for dining under the stars or weekend family fun, more fresh garden ideas. Outdoor entertaining is becoming standard on homes in the South. Home owners have come to expect a generous patio for dining, cooking out, and simply living outside. #8 Request a delicious fresh vegetable...

Read More

In February this year, the International Sculpture Center awarded artist and sculptor Bernar Venet the 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award for his outstanding contributions to the field of landscape sculpture. Just two weeks ago, I had the distinct pleasure of meeting Venet and experiencing his world renowned landscape sculpture first hand. It was 1983 when Venet established the basic structure for his “Indeterminate Lines” steel structures and I was drawn to them at first sighting. Being near the fluid lines without specific form, something so rigid as solid steel, is compelling physically and emotionally, almost electrifying to the touch. I became a raving fan of Venet’s when I met the French born conceptual artist this summer. I was fortunate to be a dinner guest of the energetic, charming, and fascinating artist at Le Muy, the site of his Venet Foundation in Provence France this summer and home to many of his landscape sculpture. While Venet’s landscape sculpture can be seen in museums and important galleries all over the world, his paintings, photographs, films poetry, and music are less well known. Venet says “I work in all these different areas because I’m never satisfied.” A consummate creative experimentalist and intrepid artist in a surprising variety of media, surely the best viewing spot is in the artist’s personal landscape and sculpture park. Venet was inspired to create Le Muy, as a home for several of his grand scale landscape sculpture and for his foundation, by fellow artist Donald Judd. Judd created his personal gallery in Marfa, Texas and included many works by his artist friends. In Le Muy, the collection also includes works by major artists of the American minimal and conceptual movements, Dan Flavin, Richard Long, and Richard Chamberlain as well as works by Arman, César, Sol LeWitt, On Kawara, Robert Barry, Lawrence Weiner, and Carl Andre. Frank Stella designed a chapel especially for the site. According to Venet “With the Venet Foundation, I am trying to make more widely known the adventure my friends and I experienced during an extraordinary period—the 1960s and after—in the United States, a country that opened doors for me from the moment I set foot in it at the age of twenty-four. While I’ve had and still have the great privilege of living with them, the works I’ve created and those I’ve acquired do not belong to me. They were produced for cultural reasons and as such they belong to everyone, they are for everyone’s eye, pleasure and knowledge.” Venet is the most internationally exhibited French artist with 30 public sculpture exhibitions and monumental works permanently installed in cities including Auckland, Austin, Beijing, Berlin, Cologne, Denver, Geneva, Neu-Ulm, Nice, Paris, San Francisco, Seoul, Tokyo, and...

Read More

Composing a garden is a lot like composing music. There are places in the garden that invite a crescendo of blooms, and other areas that call for a something gentler, more of an adagio. A tree may be a cappella, placed without accompaniment of flora and fauna, while garden intermezzos are provided by a restful bench, an inviting birdbath, or an architectural remnant. The overture to the garden may be a stone pathway leading you into the orchestration of plant life. The point to composing a garden is to provide an overall feeling of harmony and create a truly personal connection. The composition of music is similar. Good music can inspire.  Listening to great music in an intimate chamber music setting on a weekend afternoon in the country is transformative, taking me out of my daily routine and into my imagination. And so it was on a recent Sunday with the Emerson String Quartet at the Highlands Chamber Music Festival.  The Emerson, formed in 1976 in a dorm room at NYU, now plays at Tanglewood, Ravinia, Lincoln Center and broadcast nationally on NPR.  Marcia Weber Gardens to Love was privileged to sponsor their first appearance at the Performing Arts Center in Highlands, NC. Landscapes and gardens are like music in that good design requires rhythm, movement and some force in endless variations.  At the heart of chamber music and good design lies the spirit of collaboration and the role of the musician or the garden owner. There has to be a dialogue with the ensemble of performers or workers, a collaborative expression of experience, knowledge, and talents of its participants.  When well done, there is a transformation. The magnificence of music not only impacts people, but also is said to impact plants. The right tones, rhythm, and harmonies can actually promote plant growth by helping them open up to growth potential when they would otherwise be dormant. Music transforms all forms of life....

Read More

As Seen In...